How Not to Train for a World Meet

How Not to Train for a World Meet

Oct 1, 2016

2016-09-10-13-30-51

^My Heavy Metal and Power – 20 ton rotor, 40 ton generator, 30 MegaWatts, 13,800 Volts^

Yes, here I go again.  Except this time as a Masters 3.

I own a consulting firm that specializes in electrical machines and we have clients world-wide. Projects have been progressing quite well and I was looking forward to a little extra training time. However, just like 2XL Powerlifting LLC, in which we needed to move from our 3400 sq ft space to a 10,500 sq ft space, the consulting firm has been growing about as fast.

2016-08-28-18-41-38

^2XL Partners Joe Atef, Me, Eric Stone^

In the first week of training for full power I ended up in S. Korea on a project followed by an immediate emergency trip to another client, and a return to finish building out the gym, which was interrupted by additional trips, hiring of employees and more travel. The result has been training an average of 2-3 days per week.

By adjusting my site visits a bit, and looking for local power gyms, I was able to pick training back up to 3+ days per week and changed my focus from full power to bench only. This provided flexibility as I do not feel comfortable breaking in a new Leviathan Pro (I have the upgrade subscription in which I received an upgrade a few weeks ago) while on the road. My last experience set me back a few years.

The question is: do I feel ready to go into a world competition with this schedule? Yes, absolutely. I’ve always done well with a little extra rest and I have been primarily in areas where I am familiar with the local gyms and their equipment. This does give me the advantage of flexibility.

2016-08-27-15-33-04

^Installing Energy Efficient Lighting at the New Gym – Takes Time^

With longer rest periods between training times, I can go a little heavier with volume work. With WPC Worlds coming up pretty quick the training program has been flexible. The good news is this is how I have always trained – although in the past I had a few additional days per week.

In addition, seeing as I am capable, I continue working squats and deadlift training as I feel that both movements have a positive impact on my bench. Today was a typical raw (assisted) training program in preparation for the use of a single ply bench shirt – bench movements performed in a power rack with a narrow, slippery moveable bench, and full range of motion. I feel this gives me some instability and more ability to recover.

  • Stretch and warm-ups
  • Bar (depends on gym – some are 45, 50 or 55 lb – I concentrate on the plates, not the bar weight) plus red bands for resistance for 2-3 sets of 8.
  • Add 45s to each side for a set of resistance 5, then another for a set of 5.
  • Add 45s and some change for a few no-resistance raw sets of 1-3 depending on how I feel.
  • Add reverse bands positioned so that I keep with the projected bar path in my shirt. Add 45s for a set of 3-4, then 25s for a set of 3-4.
  • Continue until I have challenges removing the weight from the rack then add in a bench daddy and continue up until unable to unrack the weights (I’ve found if I can unrack it I can do the weight).
  • Drop down to 275-ish for pause sets (~5 seconds per rep, 3-5 reps, 5 sets)
  • Drop down to 225-ish for 3 sets of 20 reps.
  • Rows – heavy for sets of 12 (bar or chest supported)
  • Pulldowns – heavy for sets of 12-20
  • Other back work – depends on what is available.
  • Shoulder work.
  • Tricep work (last) – heavy for sets of 20.

Plans for Monday – squats

  • Hip flexor stretches and other stretching.
  • Warm ups with sizeable jumps – sets of 5.
  • 10 sets of 10 progressing from 400+ depending on bar weight with small jumps to final sets with 500+, briefs and medium knee sleeves only.
  • Deadlifts for sets of 2-3 up to max double.
  • Shrugs from 20 progressing down to 12 as weight increases with bar in front.
  • Good mornings – medium weight for sets of 3-4.
  • ‘Core’ work

Next bench session – shirt (single-plys are relatively easy to carry in my luggage), if able, hopefully at my home gym. Squats and deadlifts are done with the team when at my home gym and are usually sets of 3-5 to whatever weight and intensity is selected for the day.

The above training is adjusted depending on the location and energy levels related to work intensity (projects may require lots of sitting in meetings or typing, thinking or climbing around powerful heavy metal). The workload that we have been seeing has impacted my ability to properly program as many projects are ‘reactive’ – meaning that they are urgent calls for immediate problems.

Work – life – training balance… what happens when it is unbalanced? We shall see in November. I had similar experiences leading in to the UPA Relentless and ended up going in with an unplanned single-ply shirt that I had only used a few times (touches at the meet were the 4-5-6th ones) with pretty good success, although very light. The above training appears to be providing me with higher weights than my experience at Relentless and I have a lot more experience touching with it.

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